Posted 1 day ago
cardigan-and-boots:

trust-me-im-the-editor:

golden-states:

kekkejulabu:

emilarius:

#better than whoever you wanted to play Katniss

Can I just say that that is an excellent example of a forward role and not at all encumbered by the bow
Well done, Jennifer

girl crush

Can I also just say that is an excellent example of a proper anchor in archery and she is holding the bow perfectly
Again, well done, Jennifer

I see the archery fandom has raised its noble head
Well done, Archery Fandom

and the gymnastic coach in me wants to point out it is actually a shoulder roll and not a forward roll. Two different things, but it is a nice one.

cardigan-and-boots:

trust-me-im-the-editor:

golden-states:

kekkejulabu:

emilarius:

#better than whoever you wanted to play Katniss

Can I just say that that is an excellent example of a forward role and not at all encumbered by the bow

Well done, Jennifer

girl crush

Can I also just say that is an excellent example of a proper anchor in archery and she is holding the bow perfectly

Again, well done, Jennifer

I see the archery fandom has raised its noble head

Well done, Archery Fandom

and the gymnastic coach in me wants to point out it is actually a shoulder roll and not a forward roll. Two different things, but it is a nice one.

(Source: e-verdeen)

Posted 1 day ago

There is a quote going around from Gene Roddenberry today and it’s only part of the quote.

What is missing is the mention of McCoy as part of the triad, "the dramatic embodiment of the parts of one person: logic, emotion, and the balance". Yes, he talks about creating Kirk and Spock as two parts of one, but he also talks about McCoy as being another part of the one in a third.

In Gene’s own words, from well before the interview where the quote doing the rounds of today is from, have a picture of Bones (Karl) reading it out.

So according to this the emotion is Bones. What is a relationship without emotion? Unless it is Kirk, Spock and McCoy it isn’t the triad as it was originally created by Gene Roddenberry.

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 week ago

karlurbaninternational:

Karl Urban at DragonCon 2014 “I Love Pranks”

Love his Michael Ealy impression!

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

theniwokesoftly:

I would just like to announce to everyone that at DragonCon I asked Karl Urban if the story about customs in Australia was true (when they asked if he was a convict and he said “I didn’t know you still had to be one to get in” and almost got turned away) AND IT IS. He said “Oh, yeah, I said that!” with the biggest shit-eating grin I’ve ever seen. 

As an Australian I can confirm that Karl has been telling this joke for a very long time.

And customs don’t ask if people are convicts. They do ask the same questions every country asks. ;) Karl is just a shit about Australia as many New Zealanders are (and vice versa).

Posted 2 weeks ago

champagneislife:

steamedporkbun:

a gift has been given to us and that gift is wetsuits

"Wet Suit" from Star Trek: The Compendium

idiots!

Posted 2 weeks ago

solthree:

MARTHA JONES APPRECIATION DAY, a day where we can celebrate Martha Jones (played by Freema Agyeman), the first black female companion on Doctor Who.

How to join:

Post something! Fanfic, fanart, gifs, graphics, meta, fanvid, cosplay… anything, really. Just make sure to tag your work with #martha jones appreciation day so other people can see it.

Please remember not to post any character bashing as it’s supposed to be a day of celebration.

I hope all of you can participate. See you then and have fun!

Posted 2 weeks ago

jtotheizzoe:

Doodling the Right Thing

With a few humble doodles, I think Google may have created the most widely-seen, and perhaps the most influential, science communication effort on Earth. Their series of Google search page tributes to female scientists (a few of which I’ve shared above) is a huge win for showcasing the efforts of women in science, which, unless you’ve been living under a very patriarchal rock for the past forever, you know is something the world needs very badly. 

It might seem silly to be talking about a picture like this, but we’re dealing with the Times Square billboard of internet graphics here. Every day, 730 million people visit Google.com a total of 17 billion times. Billion. Granted, not all of them see the same Google doodle, as only a small set of them are “global” doodles, but even if just 10% of daily unique visitors see a particular doodle, and just 10% of those people take the time to figure out who/what they’re looking at, that means 7+ million people a day (and that doesn’t even take into account repeated visits). I suspect that’s a low estimate, too, although I base that on nothing except my own optimism.

For comparison, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey drew just over 3 million U.S. viewers for its final episode. I’ll concede that’s not really a fair comparison, since Cosmos is a highly-produced, hour-long scripted TV series with very broad and lofty goals and a Google doodle is, well, a picture on the internet. The point I’m trying to make is not that Cosmos is less influential than a cartoon, because that’s ridiculous (although I must admit the more I think about it, I really don’t know how ridiculous it is). My point is that a Google doodle about science reaches a metric f**kton of people.

I am having a hard time thinking of another single Internet Thing that has the potential to reach so many people in a single day. No meme-filled Facebook page or educational YouTube channel comes close, and I don’t suspect any traditional science news/media sites are even in the ballpark. 

Google still has a long way to go to bring their doodle gender representation anywhere close to level. According to SPARK, only 17% of doodles between 2001-2013 were women (and 74% of them were white people). I can’t find the numbers, but on the bright side it seems like 2014 has showcased a high percentage of women in the doodles. In addition to monitoring women featured in doodles, the blog Speaking Up For Us keeps a running list of doodle-worthy women.Despite that remaining imbalance, I think this is an incredible effort on the part of Google, and we should demand even more doodles of underrepresented groups (both in science and beyond).

Can something so passive make any difference? To be honest, I don’t know, but I suspect that it does. When people only see one type of person recognized for accomplishing the Great Scientific Things of history, they consciously and subconsciously assume that only that type of person actually accomplishes Great Scientific Things. That is how underrepresented people stay underrepresented, which is the opposite thing we want to happen.

Google doodles aren’t going to cure cancer or send a human to Mars, but they just might help inspire the person who does. Not bad for a drawing.

Posted 2 weeks ago
Race is there and it is a constant. If you are tired of hearing about it imagine how fucking exhausting it is living it.
Jon Stewart in response to Fox News on Ferguson (via angelaissomewhere)